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Why my jewelry isn't stamped with the Sterling Silver.925 mark.
· · · 2 comments

Why my jewelry isn't stamped with the Sterling Silver.925 mark.

· · · 2 comments

The Truth About Makers Mark and .925 Sterling Silver Stamped Jewelry   

 There's a lot of misinformation out there about stamped jewelry. Most people think that all jewelry is stamped with its precious metal content, but that's actually not the case. In fact, U.S. law does not require makers of precious metal jewelry to stamp an item with its precious metal content. So, what does the law require? 

 

     "If a jewelry maker wants to stamp jewelry by its quality or "fineness" (e.g., "14 gold," "925 sterling silver," or "950 platinum"), then, in addition to the fineness stamp, the maker must stamp the metal with its federally registered trademark. This second stamp, which should be in proximity to the quality mark, indicates that the maker is liable for the amount of precious metal the jewelry contains."

     So, why don't all jewelers stamp their jewelry? There are a few reasons. First, some jewelers make their own metals and alloys, so they don't need to stamp their products. Second, some jewelers use recycled metals, which may not be stamped because they don't know the original source of the metal. And finally, some jewelers simply choose not to stamp their products because they feel it detracts from the aesthetics of the piece.             

   

  

      I am new to the business world, and I have a lot to learn about running a small business. To be honest, I haven't yet finalized my brand identity and therefore don't have a makers mark stamp. Would I do this in the future? Maybe! But right now, my focus is on making high-quality pieces that make you look and feel amazing!  
    
     A metalsmith should have no problem answering any questions you may have about a piece's precious metal content. I know I was asked multiple times at Forest Fair this year, and was happy to answer. I didn't have any idea about this until I became a metalsmith myself, and the couple people that asked didn't either, and were happy to understand why my work wasn't stamped with the .925 mark.   
       
     Were you aware that metalsmiths and jewelry makers do not have to stamp their work? Do you like to see a maker's stamp on the back of handcrafted jewelry pieces? Does it not matter when buying from small businesses that are open about their work process? I'm curious to know if this makes a difference when shopping for one-of-a-kind jewelry at markets and events. What are your feelings on this?

Leave a comment below and let's chat about this.

Cheers!

Kelly